Thankfully

The Lord has dealt with me according to my righteousness;
    according to the cleanness of my hands he has rewarded me.  Psalm 18:20

If our righteousness depended on what we did, we’d be in a very sorry state. It’s one of the largest excuses people will tell you how they think they’ll get to heaven. It goes something like this: “all my good will be weighed against my bad, and I think my good will outweigh the bad.” When questioned further they could not tell you how much good that is – nor can they tell you how much bad that it is. In other words, there are no standards.

With Christ though, none of us meet the standard on our own. “there is none righteous, no not one.”

So, while it seems like David is weighing the bad and the good, he would have known Isaiah 64:6 All of us have become like one who is unclean, and all our righteous acts are like filthy rags.”

David realizes his righteousness is not of his own doing, but that of Christ’s. It’s certainly not from anything David or we did.

Thankfully.

Continue Reading

A Delight

7 The earth trembled and quaked,
    and the foundations of the mountains shook;
    they trembled because he was angry.
8 Smoke rose from his nostrils;
    consuming fire came from his mouth,
    burning coals blazed out of it.
9 He parted the heavens and came down;
    dark clouds were under his feet.
10 He mounted the cherubim and flew;
    he soared on the wings of the wind.
11 He made darkness his covering, his canopy around him—
    the dark rain clouds of the sky.
12 Out of the brightness of his presence clouds advanced,
    with hailstones and bolts of lightning.
13 The Lord thundered from heaven;
    the voice of the Most High resounded.
14 He shot his arrows and scattered the enemy,
    with great bolts of lightning he routed them.
15 The valleys of the sea were exposed
    and the foundations of the earth laid bare
at your rebuke, Lord,
    at the blast of breath from your nostrils.
16 He reached down from on high and took hold of me;
    he drew me out of deep waters.
17 He rescued me from my powerful enemy,
    from my foes, who were too strong for me.
18 They confronted me in the day of my disaster,
    but the Lord was my support.
19 He brought me out into a spacious place;
    he rescued me because he delighted in me. Psalm 18:7-19

The imagery David describes is vivid and emphasizes a great point. David called to Him, and God “moved heaven and earth” to rescue him. Why? It’s the question King David probably asked too. It’s summed up in verse 19: “because He delighted in me.”

Can you imagine that revelation when David figured it out?!

When it hits us, we too should be overwhelmed with the thought: he delights in me.

Continue Reading

Becoming Desperate For God

The cords of death entangled me;
    the torrents of destruction overwhelmed me.
The cords of the grave coiled around me;
    the snares of death confronted me.

In my distress I called to the Lord;
    I cried to my God for help.
From his temple he heard my voice;
    my cry came before him, into his ears. Psalm 18:4-6

For most of us, we’re not “desperate for God” as David was. He could probably feel Saul breathing down his neck. He cried to God like there was no tomorrow, and it was very real in his life.

So the question I ask is, what will it take for us not only to “need” God but to be desperate for Him. I write that not at all knowing personal situations of most readers so forgive me if I misspeak about your needs and desperation.

Everything about us hinges on that question: what will it take – or what am I willing to do – to be desperate for God? Our life, ministry, and relationships are all affected by the answer to that question – even if the answer is “I’m not willing to do a thing to become desperate for God” it sill will affect your life and ministry.

I would also like to remind you of a post I made two days ago, one that for some reason may not have been sent. It’s Day 3.

The Lord is my rock, my fortress and my deliverer;
    my God is my rock, in whom I take refuge,
    my shield and the horn of my salvation, my stronghold. Psalm 18:2

The words used to describe the Lord are related, and there’s no doubt of their intent. When he wrote this, King David was still being hunted by Saul. It’s certainly not an accident that he uses these phrases. It’s clear that despite overwhelming odds of him remaining alive, David has unwavering confidence in the Lord to protect and deliver him.

Was David naive? Of course not. He realized (as we should) that even if Saul were to catch up with him and take his life, David’s soul would still be perfectly safe.

All too often we forget that “this world is not our home” and “we’re only passing through.”

When I was a new Christian, I recall hearing the phrase “don’t be so heavenly minded that you’re no earthly good.” I’m afraid the pendulum has swung to the opposite that “we’re so earthly minded that we’re no heavenly good” to the extent that we don’t consider eternal things often enough.

How would it change your life if, for the next 30 days, you thought about heaven for five minutes out of your day?

Continue Reading

Heavenly Vs. Earthly Good

The Lord is my rock, my fortress and my deliverer;
    my God is my rock, in whom I take refuge,
    my shield and the horn of my salvation, my stronghold. Psalm 18:2

The words used to describe the Lord are related, and there’s no doubt of their intent. When he wrote this, King David was still being hunted by Saul. It’s certainly not an accident that he uses these phrases. It’s clear that despite overwhelming odds of him remaining alive, David had unwavering confidence in the Lord to protect and deliver him.

Was David naive? Of course not. He realized (as we should) that even if Saul were to catch up with him and take his life, David’s soul would still be perfectly safe.

All too often we forget that “this world is not our home” and “we’re only passing through.”

When I was a new Christian, I recall hearing the phrase “don’t be so heavenly minded that you’re no earthly good.” I’m afraid the pendulum has swung to the opposite that “we’re so earthly minded that we’re no heavenly good” to the extent that we don’t consider eternal things often enough.

How would it change your life if, for the next 30 days, you thought about heaven for five minutes out of your day?

Take the challenge with me and report your findings.

Continue Reading
Close Menu